Politics of the Internet

COURSE INFORMATION

COURSE NAME

POLITICS OF THE INTERNET

Course Code

DΕ 4019

Course Type

Optional

Level of Course

Undergraduate

Year of Study

2nd

Term

Spring

ECTS Credits

5

Name of Instructor

Dimitrios Vagianos

E-mail

-

Office Hours

Monday 12:00-14:00 and Fridays, 10:00-12:00 (Possible changes are announced in Compus (http://compus.uom.gr)

In-Classroom Study

3 hours per week

Out-of-Classroom Study

1 hour per week

Objective of the Course

At the end of the course students will be expected a) to have a basic familiarity with the Internet’s underlying technology and b) to have an in-depth understanding of the most salient political and policy issues involved.

Prerequisites

None

Course Contents

This course aims to provide students with a general introduction to some of the most salient issues surrounding the relationship between the Internet and Politics. It is structured around two broad but interrelated questions. Firstly, how has politics affected the evolution of the internet both in the past and in the present? And secondly, how does the internet affect traditional forms of political activity and mobilisation?
To this end the course focuses on three substantive domains: 1) Internet's Political Prehistory and Access principles; 2) Internet's Institutions and the use of the Internet as a potential tool for enhancing participation and democratic governance; 3) the governance of the internet's technological architecture.
The course is open to students from a variety of backgrounds and does not presuppose any particular technical knowledge.
The course lectures are divided in 3 sections: the Introductory lectures, the Politics of the Internet area lectures and the Internet Policy area lectures.

Recommended Readings

Mainly lecture notes and handouts distributed by the instructor

Further reading: Andrew Chadwick (2006) “Internet Politics: States, Citizens and New Communication Technologies”, Oxford University Press.

or

Andrew Chadwick & Philip N. Howard (2009) “The handbook of Internet Politics”, Routledge International Handbooks.

More selected readings are linked on the compus (e-learning platform) course site of the University.

Teaching Methods

Seminar

Assesment Methods

100% written assignment, 3000 words, presentation in class or to instructor’s office

Language of Instruction

English

Course Schedule

 

1. Week

Introduction to Internet Politics

2. Week

A political Prehistory of the Internet

3. Week

Concepts and themes of Internet Politics-Part I

4. Week

Concepts and themes of Internet Politics-Part II

5. Week

Understanding the Digital Divide

6. Week

E-Democracy: Community, Deliberation & Participation

7. Week

E-mobilization- Part I: Interest Groups & Social Movements

8. Week

E-mobilization- Part II: Hacktivism

9. Week

E-Campaigning

10.Week

E-Government-Part I: Improving public administration

11.Week

E-Government-Part II: Democratization

12.Week

Internet Governance