Positive Psychology

COURSE INFORMATION

COURSE NAME

Positive Psychology

Course Code

 

Course Type

Optional (O)

Level of Course

Undergraduate

Year of Study

4th

Term

Fall

ECTS Credits

4

Name of Instructor

Assistant Professor Anthony Montgomery

E-mail

amontgomery@eawop.org

Office Hours

 

In-Classroom Study

 

Out-of-Classroom Study

 

Objective of the Course

To introduce students to is the scientific study of the strengths and virtues that enable individuals and communities to thrive.

Prerequisites

None

Course Contents

Positive emotions, positive individual traits, and positive institutions. The study of the strengths and virtues, such as the capacity for love and work, courage, compassion, resilience, creativity, curiosity, integrity, self-knowledge, moderation, self-control, and wisdom. Understanding positive institutions entails the study of the strengths that foster better communities, such as justice, responsibility, civility, parenting, nurturance, work ethic, leadership, teamwork, purpose, and tolerance.

Recommended Readings

Authentic Happiness by Martin Seligman. 2002, Free Press
Flow  by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi. Harper and Row, 1991

Teaching Methods

Lecture and Group Work

Assesment Methods

40% Presentation, 60% Final exams

Language of Instruction

English

Course Schedule

 

1. Week

What is Positive Psychology?

2. Week

The Evolution of Positive Emotion

3. Week

Economics and Happiness

4. Week

Optimism & Character Strengths

5. Week

Leisure, Flow and Peak Performance

6. Week

Emotional Intelligence

7. Week

Excellence and Creativity

8. Week

Interventions for Happiness and Well-being

9. Week

Positive Psychology and Teaching

10.Week

Positive Organisations

11.Week

Education and Positive Psychology

12.Week

Review

 

 

COURSE NAME

GOVERNANCE, INSTITUTIONS AND CORRUPTION IN S/E EUROPE AND THE BALKANS

Course Code

MBM 202

Course Type

Must

Level of Course

Undergraduate

Year of Study

 

Term

Autumn

ECTS Credits

10

Name of Instructor

Assist. Prof. C. J. Paraskevopoulos

E-mail

chrp@uom.gr

Office Hours

Thursday, 11-2pm

In-Classroom Study

 

Out-of-Classroom Study

 

Objective of the Course

An introduction into the concepts of governance and the role of institutions in the formation of actors’ preferences and choices thus contributing to the variation of systems of governance; theoretical framework: rational choice theory and new institutionalist approaches.

Prerequisites

None

Course Contents

 Governance and institutions; Rational choice theory; New institutionalist approaches; Corruption and systems of governance in comparative perspective (EU, Central- Eastern Europe and the Balkans).    

Recommended Readings

Institutions, Institutional Change and Economic Performance – Douglass C. North

Teaching Methods

Lecture

Assesment Methods

40% Midterms, 20% Homeworks, 40% Final exams

Language of Instruction

English

Course Schedule

 

1. Week

 

2. Week

 

3. Week

 

4. Week

 

5. Week

 

6. Week

 

7. Week

 

8. Week

 

9. Week

 

10.Week

 

11.Week

 

12.Week

 

 

COURSE NAME

Migrants and Refugees

Course Code

?

Course Type

Elective

Level of Course

Undergraduate

Year of Study

3rd+ 4th year students

Term

Spring 2009

ECTS Credits

10 ?

Name of Instructor

Assoc. Prof. Eftihia Voutira ….

E-mail

voutira@uom. gr

Office Hours

Thursday 12-2pm.

In-Classroom Study

3hrs / week

Out-of-Classroom Study

2hours / week

Objective of the Course

To teach about the varieties of voluntary and forced migration movements in a historical and contemporary regional (e.g. South-eastern Europe, Middle East, Africa) perspective.

Prerequisites

None

Course Contents

International Migration before 1945 (colonialism, migration to North America, the Interwar period, labour migration within Europe). Post WWII refugee movements, Decolonization.  Case studies of humanitarian emergencies (e.g. Yugoslav Conflict, Rwanda, Afghanistan, Chechnyia, Iraq).  National and International Responses. Immediate and longer term implications of refugee policies.
Post Cold war migrations and new Diasporas. Legal and illegal migration and integration policies.

Recommended Readings

The Age of Migration .International Population Movements in the Modern World. Stephen Castles and Mark Miller eds, Palgrave , 3rd edition, London 2003.

Teaching Methods

Lectures, documentaries, in class discussions.

Assesment Methods

 30% Homeworks, 10% Class participation, 60% Final Exams.

Language of Instruction

English

Course Schedule

 

1. Week

Definitions : Migrants and Refugees

2. Week

The Emergence of the International Refugee Regime

3. Week

International Migration in the Cold War period

4. Week

Cold War refugee crises ( eg. Vietnam, Tibet)

5. Week

Post colonial refugee crises ( e.g. Algeria, Uganda, Sudan)

6. Week

The Origins of the Middle-East Conflict

7. Week

The Soviet Intervention in Afghanistan and its impact on the region. The end of the Cold War in Africa . Repatriation in Mozambique, Angola and Eritrea

8. Week

Refugee Crises in the 1990’s : Former Yugoslavia, Rwanda and Zair

9. Week

 

Post Cold War Migration Regimes in the Developed countries: ‘Fortress Europe’ and Islam in the West

10.Week

Post Soviet  and East-West Migration Patterns

11.Week

The Iraq Conflict over time : 1991-2006

12.Week

International Refugee Protection and  New Labour migrations